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3D printing can be incredibly helpful in prototyping new medical devices and training new physicians, but its truly transformative power becomes apparent when a patient’s life is on the line. Kaleida Health’s Gates Vascular Institute (GVI), University at Buffalo, and the Jacobs Institute of Buffalo, New York, came together to offer Teresa Flint a second chance at life. A 49 year- old mother of three, Flint was referred to the GVI following an extended period of inexplicably diminishing vision, which they determined to be the result of a cerebral aneurysm – a life-threatening condition.

 

An aneurysm is the result of a weakened area within an artery filling with blood and putting pressure on nearby tissue. A brain aneurysm rupture can cause massive internal bleeding, stroke and even death. In many cases, doctors have several options for treatment, but because no two aneurysms are identical, success requires deep knowledge of the patient’s unique vascular anatomy. “Right now we’ve prepared for complications on a theoretical basis,” said Dr. Adnan Siddiqui. “Many times, despite the best theoretical planning, we are faced with circumstances where we don’t know what to do.” With the help of Stratasys 3D Printing, surgical teams now have an advanced tool to help them find the right method to isolate the patient’s blood vessel, helping reduce risks associated with delays and potential complications with various surgical approaches.

computer screens showing models of blood vessels
The team at Jacobs Institute tests out new devices in the surgical lab using a patient-specific 3D printed model designed to replicate both the look and feel of her anatomy.
“Based on the Stratasys 3D model, we were able to pre-empt potential complications and devise a more optimal means of treating Teresa's aneurysm.”
Dr. Adnan Siddiqui
Stratasys 3D Printers Homepage
Perfecting surgical skills with Tissue Matrix

Real Challenge

As heart surgeries become increasingly intricate and complicated, planning patient-specific care for challenging cases has become more difficult using traditional methods. “When you are dealing with a complex situation where different organ systems are abnormal, each one needing its own specialist team with real-time decision making at the time of surgery, it becomes very difficult to coordinate, plan and make decisions,” said Rajesh Krishnamurthy, M.D., section chief of radiology research at Texas Children’s Hospital.
Stratasys 3D Printers Homepage
Perfecting surgical skills with Tissue Matrix

Real Challenge

As heart surgeries become increasingly intricate and complicated, planning patient-specific care for challenging cases has become more difficult using traditional methods. “When you are dealing with a complex situation where different organ systems are abnormal, each one needing its own specialist team with real-time decision making at the time of surgery, it becomes very difficult to coordinate, plan and make decisions,” said Rajesh Krishnamurthy, M.D., section chief of radiology research at Texas Children’s Hospital.